The last several lessons focused on decision-making and the creative process. Now let us touch on a few final topics as this year comes to an end. The end of the year is a great time to contemplate the past year and what we’d like to accomplish next year.
Contemplation requires us to slow down from our hectic pace, stop, and think. We need time to think without the pressures of daily life. The first step in goal setting is carving out time for doing this. What works well for me is to sit on my back patio, get a brew like coffee or beer, and take in my surrounding. It’s autumn right now so the maple leaves are turning yellow and red, falling to the ground and covering the lawn. The temps are perfect.
Just sit, take in the environment, and let your feelings arise as you reflect on the past year. When you slow down like this, you allow feelings about the quality of your life to surface. Have you challenged yourself this last year? Did you accomplish what you intended? Did you learn anything and expand your awareness? It’s in moments like these that you become aware of deeper issues and desires in your life.
How does this manifest itself in your climbing? How have you challenged yourself on climbs? Did you accomplish routes or climbing goals you intended? Did you learn more about why you’re fearful or what limits your climbing? Are you going to the same ole climbing areas, climbing the same ole routes? Do you really want to be sitting here next year feeling the same way?
Take this time, this moment, to ask these questions, contemplate the answers, and set goals that will create the climbing life you desire.

IMG_0882-w900-h700Contemplation requires us to slow down from our hectic pace, stop, and think. We need time to think without the pressures of daily life. The first step in goal setting is carving out time for doing this. What works well for me is to sit on my back patio, get a brew like coffee or beer, and take in my surrounding. It’s autumn right now so the maple leaves are turning yellow and red, falling to the ground and covering the lawn. The temps are perfect.

Just sit, take in the environment, and let your feelings arise as you reflect on the past year. When you slow down like this, you allow feelings about the quality of your life to surface. Have you challenged yourself this last year? Did you accomplish what you intended? Did you learn anything and expand your awareness? It’s in moments like these that you become aware of deeper issues and desires in your life.

How does this manifest itself in your climbing? How have you challenged yourself on climbs? Did you accomplish routes or climbing goals you intended? Did you learn more about why you’re fearful or what limits your climbing? Are you going to the same ole climbing areas, climbing the same ole routes? Do you really want to be sitting here next year feeling the same way?

Take this time, this moment, to ask these questions, contemplate the answers, and set goals that will create the climbing life you desire.

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. Hi, Arno. I have a list of goal climbs. This year I finished about half of them, but the resting half is now not challenging for me, due progress I made this year. Now I see more other challenging routes, where I want spent my time and effort. What do you think about abandoning old unaccomplished goals, and changing them for a new ones? I guess that the direction and continuity to big-long therm goal is important.

  2. Hello Jan, I don’t see anything wrong with changing goals. Remember, the difference between foundational, primary, and secondary decision and goals as outlined in previous elessons. The foundational goal addresses why we climb. I don’t think you are referring to such goals but rather secondary goals, which are OK to modify as you learn. New goals can be set to replace those.

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