Article: On-Sighting Tendencies
We have looked at redpointing and tendencies we can fall into based on being analytical or intuitive. Let’s look at how this effects on-sighting.
On-sight climbing has many unknowns, which creates ambiguity and requires making many decisions quickly. “Where should I stop? How long should I rest? What do I need to do to climb the next section?” Don’t wait for perfect answers to these questions. Take action more quickly.
Analytical climbers have difficulty with ambigious situations and can get lost in the questions. If this is your tendency, then you need to learn to think less and take action more quickly. Do this by doing the “lookings” process and create a flexible plan. Then make the best decision you can and commit to action without further thinking. If questions come up, then probe into the next section instead of allowing your mind to dwell on the questions themselves.
Intuitive climbers do better with ambigious situations but rush themselves and don’t think enough. Doing this can cause you to miss holds. If this is your tendency, then stop at stances and consciously do the “lookings” process before engaging. Create a flexible plan you can modify as you probe and engage.
In on-sighting, we need to create a flexible plan and modify it as we climb. We need to decide what to do and when to act. Don’t stall by over-thinking; don’t rush by under-thinking. Stay at stances long enough to plan and rest, and then commit fully. You may commit to climbing 10 feet or 2 moves depending on how much your plan needs to be modif

SW 2011 013-w900-h700We have looked at redpointing and tendencies we can fall into based on being analytical or intuitive. Let’s look at how this effects on-sighting.

On-sight climbing has many unknowns, which creates ambiguity and requires making many decisions quickly. “Where should I stop? How long should I rest? What do I need to do to climb the next section?” Don’t wait for perfect answers to these questions. Take action more quickly.

Analytical climbers have difficulty with ambigious situations and can get lost in the questions. If this is your tendency, then you need to learn to think less and take action more quickly. Do this by doing the “lookings” process and create a flexible plan. Then make the best decision you can and commit to action without further thinking. If questions come up, then probe into the next section instead of allowing your mind to dwell on the questions themselves.

Intuitive climbers do better with ambigious situations but rush themselves and don’t think enough. Doing this can cause you to miss holds. If this is your tendency, then stop at stances and consciously do the “lookings” process before engaging. Create a flexible plan you can modify as you probe and engage.

In on-sighting, we need to create a flexible plan and modify it as we climb. We need to decide what to do and when to act. Don’t stall by over-thinking; don’t rush by under-thinking. Stay at stances long enough to plan and rest, and then commit fully. You may commit to climbing 10 feet or 2 moves depending on how much your plan needs to be modified.

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. Cool article. I fall on the overly analytical side (pun intended). It helps me to have a flexible plan, I think I’ll do it this way…but then if I am at my best mentally I often can’t even remember what I did through the crux. It helps me to accept only two consequences – get to the top or fall trying. Thanks for the article.

  2. I’m happy I’m taking the falling and committing camp. Last weekend I realized how those 2 components made me stall and top rope a route I could have on-sighted. The funny thing is that I did the 1st two runouts (and the hardest as I discovered later) and then I completely paralyzed. I still don’t know where do I fall (hehe) analytical or intuitive. I think I have both or at least at that moment. I rushed to the climb without doing the “lookings” and at the crux I was exhausted mentally and physically (or that is what I thought). Looking forward for a “lookings” article.

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