In the last lesson I outlined how we can be analytical or intuitive and how that can limit or help us while redpointing. We need to diminish the limiting tendency so we can improve our redpointing.
Recall that analytical climbers tend to make accurate, detailed plans, and rehearse thoroughly. Their challenge is to stop over-thinking, modifying their plan, during the redpoint effort.
Intuitive climbers tend not to work the route enough to make detailed plans. Then, they use a lot of energy refining it during redpoint efforts. They don’t think enough.
In redpointing, we need to work a route enough to create an accurate plan, and then stick to it. Thinking about what to do becomes less important than thinking about when to act. If you are more analytical, then you will tend to stall out, get stuck at stances and over-think. You may think about alternative plans or stay at stances too long. Doing this will delay when it’s best to commit to the next section.
If you are more intuitive, then you will tend to rush and under-think. You won’t rest enough at stances and rush into climbing too quickly. Doing this will hurry your decision about when it’s best to commit to the next section.
Either way, you need to utilize stances long enough to rest and decide when is best to continue climbing.
Training 002-w900-h700
Jeff Noffsinger training on Arno’s “machine”

In the last lesson I outlined how we can be analytical or intuitive in our redpoint approach and how that can limit or help us while redpointing.

To improve our redpointing we need to diminish the limiting tendency (i.e. being too much analytical or intuitive vs developing both).

A Recap About Analytical & Inuitive Climbing

Recall that analytical climbers tend to make accurate, detailed plans, and rehearse thoroughly. Their challenge is to stop over-thinking, modifying their plan, during the redpoint effort.

Intuitive climbers tend not to work the route enough to make detailed plans. Then, they use a lot of energy refining it during redpoint efforts. They don’t think enough.

 

How to Stick to The Redpoint Plan and When to Climb

In redpointing, we need to work a route enough to create an accurate plan, and then stick to it.

Thinking about what to do becomes less important than thinking about when to act.

If you are more analytical, then you will tend to stall out, get stuck at stances and over-think. You may think about alternative plans or stay at stances too long. Doing this will delay when it’s best to commit to the next section.

If you are more intuitive, then you will tend to rush and under-think. You won’t rest enough at stances and rush into climbing too quickly. Doing this will hurry your decision about when it’s best to commit to the next section.

Either way, you need to utilize stances long enough to rest and decide when is best to continue climbing.

This Post Has 4 Comments

  1. That’s intence, nice picture of chaindog….plus a lot of great information

  2. I think the subtlety of what you have written with ‘analysing’ versus ‘following intuition’ applies a lot with on-sighting as well as red-pointing particularly becuase a lot of analysis is necessary when you don’t know what will work. This last weekend I noticed a few times on a route that I would look at a section of wall that was sloped, not an edge but a spot to place a foot, in a flash my body and mind would naturally think “step there” but because it was sloped and I was uncertain about my fall I hesitated. Relative to simply following intuition it took a very long time to convince myself that a fall was unlikely and my foot would stick. In the end the move was fine. I think the body and eyes know very what is possible but it only takes an instant of doubt to interupt a an intuitive movement and it takes much longer to reconvince yourself that your first estimate was accurate. Definitely a fine skill to balance analysing and intuiting.

  3. Go Chaindog! Great picture! And this is helpful information.

  4. I think everything is relative when it comes to Arts & Disciplines … Take Martial Arts for instance, You have a redpoint as well… Knowing when to attack versus, waiting to long and miss the opportunity to strike… When your rank & discipline increase, you do it automatically… It’s called No Mind… Music, jazz for instance, is the same way… Knowing when to go out of the box & letting your self Go, don’t over analyze it, No Mind again…

    Love, d

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